Mnaamodzawin Health Services first aboriginal agency to be named a Best Practice Spotlight Organization

Mnaamodzawin Health Services staff make their grand entry into the conference room at the Manitoulin Hotel and Conference Centre in Little Current last week where the organization celebrated its selection as one of nine health care organizations in Canada to be identified as a Best Practice Spotlight Organization (BPSO).

MANITOULIN—Mnaamodzawin Health Services in Aundeck Omni Kaning First Nation (AOK) has been selected as one of nine health care organizations in Canada to be identified as a Best Practice Spotlight Organization (BPSO) and is the first aboriginal agency of its kind to receive this distinction.

“There are currently 92 BPSOs, world wide with a total of 450 sites,” a press release from Mnaamodzawin Health Services notes. “BPSOs are healthcare and academic organizations selected by the Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario (RNAO) through a proposals process to implement and evaluate the RNAO’s best practice guidelines. It’s a partnership that focuses on making a positive impact on patient care through evidence-based practice. It provides support to organizations that have formally agreed to implement and evaluate multiple RNAO best practice guideline over a three year period.”

Aundeck Omni Kaning Chief Patsy Corbiere congratulates Mnaamodzawin on their  identification as a BPSO.
Aundeck Omni Kaning Chief Patsy Corbiere congratulates Mnaamodzawin on their
identification as a BPSO.

Mnaamodzawin Health Services celebrated its pre-designation last week with a launch event. The organization will work to implement five best practice guidelines over the next three years before officially being designated as a BPSO

The Sheguiandah Drum Group began the event held at the Manitoulin Hotel and Conference Centre with an honour song, followed by a grand entry of the Mnaamodzawin staff.

After the opening prayer by Leona Nahwegahbow, Mnaamodzawin Vice President Leonard Genereaux gave the opening remarks.

“We are delighted to hear from the RNAO and to be the first aboriginal agency to be identified as a BPSO,” said Mr. Genereaux. “The board of directors has every confidence that staff will be able to achieve this goal in the next three years.”

“I am privileged and honoured to be here today to attend the Mnaamodwazin Health Services official launch as the RNAO BPSO,” said AOK Chief Patsy Corbiere. “This is a fantastic opportunity that will have positive impacts on patient care. Through consistent use of evidence based practices we can learn and teach one another to continuously improve on the care we provide to our people.”

“From a humble beginning, I’ve seen the growth of our health care system from one health nurse to a team of 26 quality health care professionals under the Mnaamodzawin Health Services umbrella,” continued Ms. Corbiere. “Walking four miles into Little Current to see the health nurse in the early days was a norm, but unacceptable. Today, we have nursing services offered right in our homes and communities. Health care has definitely changed over time. For this reason, I am extremely proud of Mnaamodzawin Health Services and their accomplishment, and most importantly, their capacity to deliver the project requirements of the BPSO program. I’ve seen progress in this health organization throughout the years and I believe the new initiative will only strengthen our abilities to refocus and implement best practice guidelines to better service our people.”

Mnaamodzawin Director of Care Debbie Selent led the audience through the BPSO plans and timeline.

Ms. Selent explained that Mnaamodzawin has identified five best practice guidelines they will be implementing over the next three years including: the assessment and management of venous leg ulcers, client centered care, assessment and management of foot ulcers for people with diabetes, embracing cultural diversity in health care: developing cultural competencies and care and maintenance to reduce vascular access complications.

“What makes this so special is that we are the first aboriginal or First Nation organization to be selected as a BPSO,” Mnaamodzawin Operational Director Julie Morin told The Expositor. “We will also be receiving $100,000 over the next three years to develop policies and procedures to allow us to implement the best practices. As part of our designation, we will also have to implement three more best practices every three years to maintain our BPSO identification.”

Mnaamodzawin Health Services is a non-profit organization that was established in 1995 and incorporated in 1999. It is the regional health authority for five First Nation communities including AOK, Sheguiandah, Sheshegwaning, Whitefish River and Zhiibaahaasing First Nations.