BEVERLY JOHN MCGILL

BEVERLY JOHN MCGILL
October 5, 1918 – July 3, 2022
It is with deep sadness that we announce the death of Beverly John McGill in Toronto on July 3, 2022 in his 104th year. Bev is survived by his daughter Helen Elizabeth McGill and his niece and nephews. Bev was born on October 5, 1918 on a farm at Ice Lake. He was the eldest child of the late Elizabeth Marguerite (Wright) McGill and the late James Roger Beverly McGill. He was predeceased by his wife, Jessie (Coulthurst) McGill, and his sisters Myra Marguerite (McGill) MacVicar, Alice Jean (McGill) Purvis, and Ruth Elizabeth McGill. Raised and educated mainly in Gore Bay, Bev left Manitoulin (“What other Island is there?”, as he would say) in 1938 to join the Royal Bank of Canada in Sault Ste. Marie. He transferred to southwestern Ontario, then northwestern Ontario and, in 1941, he enlisted in the Canadian Army. He received military training in Winnipeg as a member of the Royal Winnipeg Rifles and was sent overseas. He served in the United Kingdom and Continental Europe. In 1946, he returned to Canada and after being discharged, rejoined the RBC, this time in Montreal. After meeting in Vancouver and a long (according to Jessie) courtship, Bev and Jessie were married on November 10, 1951. They were truly the love of each other’s lives. Bev’s RBC career was so much more than a series of positions: it was about serving clients and colleagues, seeking to help them realize their potential. Personal, human relationships were at the core of how Bev defined success. He and Jessie had postings in Canada from Vancouver to Montreal, and internationally, including Port of Spain, Trinidad and New York City. Bev was glad for the experiences earned from every position he held. Being the head of the International Division was perhaps his favourite. In the last 10 years of his career at Royal Bank, he logged more than half a million air miles and had business trips to some 50 countries. That same year, he joined Canadian Pacific Hotels as Chairman of the Board and became a director of the Bank of Tokyo. The words most often used when people would describe Bev were “a man of integrity” and “a true gentleman”, as well as commenting often about his strong handshake! That integrity, his kindness, and sense of fun will be sorely missed. Bev knew times of want and times of plenty. Throughout his life, he had a profound sense of thankfulness, which in turn sparked a generosity of heart especially for the disadvantaged. His life is an inspiration to many. Now may he go in peace. Cremation and funeral have taken place. Interment at Gordon Cemetery will take place at a later date.